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1,000 Foot Ore Freighter, Soo Locks, MI

1,000 Foot Ore Freighter, Soo Locks, MI

Near Peggys Cove, Nova Scotia

Near Peggys Cove, Nova Scotia

Colorful Truck Sales, Weed, CA

Colorful Truck Sales, Weed, CA

Hollywood Sign

Hollywood Sign

Mackinac Bridge, MI

Mackinac Bridge, MI

Pelicans, Grays Harbor, WA

Pelicans, Grays Harbor, WA

Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone National Park

Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone National Park

Elk and Deer, Yes – Whales, Not So Much…Again

I mentioned that I might go out and get the plywood for our shed base this afternoon, but decided to just stay at home and wait until Thursday when we have to go out anyway for groceries.

With our RV-sized refrigerator it’s hard to go very long without stocking up again at least as far as fresh salads, meats, and veggies go. Which is pretty much most of what we eat.

Turns out I also need to get a new CO/Smoke Alarm. One of ours start beeping twice every 30 seconds, so I replaced the batteries, which didn’t help. But reading the very tiny print on the unit, I discovered that the CO monitor part had ‘aged’ out and so the alarm needed to be replaced.

So that’s on the WalMart/Home Depot list too.

And now for something Flu-Free.


Originally posted on May 15, 2010

We started off our last day in Klamath, CA with breakfast at the Klamath River Café just like yesterday.

I had the eggs, bacon, and 3 pancakes. The pancakes were so large that I could only eat one.

After breakfast we stopped by the Post Office to mail off some packages, but since it was Saturday, it was closed. In small towns, apparently, the PO doesn’t open at all on Saturdays.

Then it was on to the Tour-Thru Tree, one of several drive-thru redwood trees in the area. This tree is still alive and still growing.

Click to Enlarge !

Click to Enlarge !

I remember driving thru a Sequoia when my family came out west on vacation back in 1964 when I was 15. When I checked it out this time, I found that it collapsed in 1969 due to heavy snowfall. The only remaining drive-thru trees are now all Redwoods.

Next, heading up the road to the Trees of Mystery place that we had seen the day before, we encountered another of the many of these signs we had seen. What’s kind of scary is that this road is about 300 feet about sea level. I don’t want to be anywhere near here when a 300 foot tsunami come through.

Click to Enlarge !

A few miles down the road we arrived at Trees of Mystery and got parked.

Click to Enlarge !

We bought our tickets and headed up the 1/2 mile trail to the beginning of the Sky Trail gondola ride.

This is the Family Tree, twelve trees growing out of one trunk.

Click to Enlarge !

This tree has a hollowed-out passageway underneath it.

Click to Enlarge !

This is Fallen Giant, a 320 foot tree that fell about 500 years ago.

Click to Enlarge !

More tall trees than you can imagine.

Click to Enlarge !

The Cathedral Tree, a ring of 9 trees, is often used for weddings and other ceremonies.

Click to Enlarge !

This is the Brotherhood Tree, 297 feet tall and 19 feet in diameter.

Click to Enlarge !

Click to Enlarge !

After a pretty steep climb, we reached the beginning of the Sky Trail and headed up the side of the mountain.

Click to Enlarge !

Getting to the top, we found a family of chipmunks living underneath the Sky Trail upper terminal. I think this was Jan’s favorite part. They were running everywhere.

Click to Enlarge !

Click to Enlarge !

The view from the top was really something.

Click to Enlarge !

Then it was time for the ride back down. I had to search Jan to be sure she wasn’t smuggling any chipmunks back down.

Click to Enlarge !

Click to Enlarge !

Starting the trail back down we saw the Towering Inferno, a tree that was stuck by lightning in December 1995. It was originally over 250 feet tall and about 1200 years old. It burned for several days and this husk is all that’s left.

Click to Enlarge !

Click to Enlarge !

The bottom part of the trail was thru the Trail of Tall Tales, consisting of large scale carvings telling stories of Paul Bunyan and his friends.

Click to Enlarge !

Click to Enlarge !

Back in the parking lot we checked out the large statues of Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox.

Click to Enlarge !

Funny, but I always thought Babe was a girl.

Click to Enlarge !

Jan thinks he’s a guy !

Click to Enlarge !

Leaving Trees of Mystery we headed down the road and out to Requa Point to do some whale watching. The brochures said we could see whales off the point here from mid-April thru May.

How many did we see?

None.

But we did find this plaque. When I first read it, I thought the human food they were referring to was US.

Click to Enlarge !

Leaving Requa Point we headed south about 95 miles to drive the Avenue of the Giants. This is a 31 mile stretch of old US 101 that threads thru some really tall trees.

Click to Enlarge !

Click to Enlarge !

Click to Enlarge !

Next we headed about about 25 miles further south and made the misinformed decision to make the 21 mile drive out to Shelter Cove where we were absolutely, positively guaranteed to see whales. What we didn’t know that this 21 mile drive would be the steepest, twistyest drive we’ve encountered since we drove up Mt Washington in New Hampshire last year. The 21 miles took us almost an hour and a half.

Of course it would all be worth it when we saw the whales.

NOT!

We saw some beautiful scenery, but nary a whale was in sight.

Click to Enlarge !

Click to Enlarge !

Click to Enlarge !

Click to Enlarge !

And, of course, we still had the 21 mile, hour and a half, drive back.

And then, of course, the 120 mile drive back home.

Coming back from Shelter Cove, we did see a lot of deer feeding along the road.

Click to Enlarge !

Getting into Eureka about 6:30 pm we stopped at a Marie Callender’s for dinner, and a couple of pieces of pie to take home with us.

Coming thru Trinidad, (no, not that one) we encountered what we had seen on a local billboard. The largest herd of Roosevelt Elk in the world crossing the road in front of us.

Finally, about 8:30 pm we got back home after a long day, and over 250 miles.

Tomorrow we travel about 160 miles north to Coos Bay, OR for a couple of days.


Thought For The Day:

Star Trek Non Essential Employees

hgdghd

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Corona Flu = ICD U07.1

First up, Brandi sent this photo over this morning, of Landon and Jack checking in to his online school class.

Landon and Jack in his Online Class

Looks like Jack is just as interested as Landon.

I had originally planned to take a KungFlu break in today’s blog, but a lot of new stuff came out overnight.

In yesterday’s blog, I talked about all the problems I saw with the modeling being used to predict the spread of the CCP (Chinese Communist Party – new acronym) Flu, and how in the last week or so, the number of deaths forecast had gone from 2.2 – 2.7 million deaths in the U.S. down to 100,000 – 240,000 deaths, mentioned as late as yesterday.

But today the model(ers) came up with a new number, 81,766, but maybe as few as 49,156. Besides the strange exactness of the new numbers compared to the old ones, what no one seems to mention is that this is pretty much the number of U.S. deaths due to the seasonal flu during the 2018-2019 season.

And don’t think that this drop is due to all the ‘mitigation’ that’s been done, i.e., businesses closed and people out of work. The 2.2 million and the 240,000 number were all based with taking the mitigation into account, I.e. they were the ‘best case’ numbers.

And just remember what Dr. Birx said about the models on Saturday:

“Just to be clear, we won’t know how valid the models are until we move all the way through the epidemic,” she said.

So she’s saying that we won’t know how accurate the models are until the epidemic is over.

Well, they do say that ‘Hindsight is 20/20’.

Another thing to notice is that according to the CDC, since the inception of the WuFlu, the deaths from the seasonal flu have dropped precipitously. So has the KungFlu replaced the seasonal flu, or are some supposed CoronaFlu cases been mistaken for the seasonal version?

Think this is not possible? Well, check out this memo from the National Center for Health Statistics instructing doctors and hospital how to handle possible KungFlu cases/deaths.

First off,  they designate a new ICD code, U07.1, and then in the last paragraph they say

‘COVID-19 should be reported on the death certificate for all decedents where the disease caused or is assumed to have caused or contributed to death.’

They go on to say that a confirmed virus test is not necessary. So how many people are actually dying from the seasonal flu and not Corona?

This leads to the governor of Connecticut announcing the death last week of a six-week old baby from the WuFlu, supposedly the youngest victim so far. And yes, the baby did test positive for the Virus. But a little further research shows the baby actually was accidently suffocated by the babysitter/nanny, probably by rolling over on the baby while napping.

Wrapping up, tomorrow I plan on running over to our nearby Home Depot to pick up a 4’ x 8’ sheet of pressure-treated plywood to make the base for our new shed. I’m also going to pick up couple of pieces of flat steel bar to use on the shed flooring to bolt it to the plywood.

I’ve already got the screw-in anchors and canvas strapping that I’ll use to strap the plywood to the ground. So hopefully in the next couple of days, we can start moving stuff into it.

sd


Thought For The Day:

Remember when we had to smack the TV because the channel wasn’t coming in clearly? Don’t you wish that work as well with some  people?


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